Tag Archives: ios

A much improved way to spell check documents using VoiceOver on iOS beginning with iOS 12.1

Posted on November 6, 2018

There was a way, reproducible though not very convenient to spellcheck documents in iOS 11 using VoiceOver and at the time I thought it was cool though somewhat difficult to remember, but wrote a blog post about it anyway.

A big thank you to Scott Davert, who discovered that in iOS 12.1 the spell checking process was made much more efficient. He recorded it in a recent Applevis podcast from where I learned about it. I have to admit even though I wrote the blog post defining how to correct spelling in iOS 11, I rarely if ever used it and just wrote things on my iPhone as I am now but then corrected the spelling on my MacBook. I think I can honestly say I will correct spelling much more or — probably whenever I write anything beyond a sentence or 2 on my iOS devices in the future. This VoiceOver improvement, truly makes any iOS device a real writing device for blind users.
In fact, I just spell checked the last paragraph possibly in less than 30 seconds on my iPhone, This will be the coolest feature for me in iOS 12.1.

Let’s figure out how to do it.

1. Set VoiceOver rotor to misspelled words.

2. Swipe up or down, or press up or down arrows on your keyboard or braille displays to find the previous or next misspelled word.

3. Move right with a finger or keyboard each time will show you the next in a list of correctly spelled suggestions.

4. If you find the word you want, double tap on it or activate it with your keyboard and it will replace the misspelled word.
5. If the word you want is not in the list, the offensive misspelling you’re on is selected so pressing delete or backspace will erase it. Then you can enter another attempt.

Now maybe I can start blogging directly from iOS. If still in school, I think I could seriously write a paper completely on iOS. Since I almost always use a Bluetooth keyboard, I could even do it on an iPhone. Hey, When not writing blog posts or school papers, spell checking emails will also be a snap.

Advertisements

How I discovered that the audio in Live Photos can help blind people identify and organize them

Posted on May 17, 2018

When Apple announced live photos along with their iPhone 6s in 2015 almost everyone I know or read thought they were nothing more than a stupid gimmick, and promptly turned them off. It took 2 plus years before advantages of Live Photos started to show up as mentioned by Allison Sheridan recently on her blog, as well as a post last year on How to Geek; but if you’re blind, you’ve had something cool since day one.

When everyone else thought Live Photos were stupid and just a silly way to waste space, I immediately realized that they brought accessibility to photos in an interesting way. With 3 seconds of audio, someone could easily provide an audio label for those pictures. If a blind person went on vacation and wanted a few pictures for their sighted family and friends, they and/or someone with them could add audio like “Uncle John and Grandma on the beach” or “Julie standing near the Eiffel Tower at night”. The possibilities are endless. Then, when a blind person scrolls through their library and opens one of their Live photos they hear the audio and can rename them for faster browsing in the future.
A sighted person could even take live photos on their phone adding audio tags, and then send them to a blind friend or family member.

I could even see a future version of iOS offer to transcribe the audio in Live photos and use that text to rename the file, that would just be cool and make my love of efficiency side all warm and happy.

Just another reminder that when a feature seems silly or useless, maybe it helps someone else in huge unimagined ways.

How to accessibly and reliably spell check documents on iOS devices with VoiceOver

Posted on October 5, 2017

Although I guess possible on older versions of iOS, until iOS 11, spell checking documents on iOS devices was extremely difficult with the screen reader  Voiceover. Occasionally when browsing around a document if VoiceOver said a word was misspelled you could maybe get suggestions if you happened to be exceptionally lucky. but now with iOS 11, here’s a totally accessible and reproducible process. Previously not being able to reliably spell check documents on iOS was a large frustration for me, and meant that all I could efficiently do on the run was to write rough drafts; having to later correct them on my mac back at home. Experiencing that spell checking was now totally doable on iOS 11, I am more than happy to share what I’ve found. I use the word activate, because there are several ways to progress workflows on iOS devices. Yes, if using only the touch screen, I mean double tap; but if a future reader is using a Bluetooth keyboard, a braille display, or the new O6, there are multiple more ways they could do it.

1. Open a document you want to spell check.

2. Make sure VoiceOver says “text field is editing” “quick nav off”.

3. rotate the VoiceOver rotor left, often only 1 menu item to “misspelled words”.

4. swipe up or down to move between a list of misspelled words.

5. after stopping on a misspelled word you want to correct, change the rotor to “edit”. Edit should be 1 rotor item to the left of misspelled words.

6. Swipe up or down to “select” and activate it. VoiceOver should say “word” selected, where word is the word you selected.

7. then swipe up or down until you get to “replace”, and activate that.

8. after a short wait, probably less than 1 second, VoiceOver will say a word, probably similar to the misspelled word you’re wanting to change. Some times, VoiceOver may also instead say text field but in this case just swipe right to the first item in the word suggestions list.

9. If that is the word you want, activate it; if not you can swipe right or left to move through the list of word suggestions until VoiceOver speaks the word you want. Then activate that word.

10. The new word you chose from the list should have replaced the previously misspelled word you wanted to correct.

Back when looking at the list of suggested words, you may also change the rotor to character and spell the words letter by letter. Yeh that works. Notifications arriving on the scene may be a different matter however.

After a few times through the process, you will probably find that it’s not as complicated as it looks. This not only works by using the touch screen, but also by using Bluetooth keyboards. If your braille display keyboard can also use the rotor, it should work for that also.

For someone who writes a lot while on the run, adding “misspelled words” to the rotor may be one of iOS 11’s most appreciated features.

A virtually unknown iOS VoiceOver feature, automatically announcing the time every minute

As an iOS VoiceOver user, several years ago I discovered that if I touched the clock status bar item VoiceOver would continue to automatically announce the time until interrupted by touch or certain incoming notifications. I can’t remember exactly when this became a feature, but it was more than 3 years ago, and I’ve never heard anyone else mention it nor have I seen it documented anywhere; so I thought I’d share it, as I can imagine it being helpful to many others.

This time announcement feature is very useful to me, especially when I’m in a hurry, and need to get ready for something quickly. I even use it occasionally with my Anker Soundcore Bluetooth speaker in the shower; time can really accelerate there. Time announcements are also available on macOS in the Date & Time Preference Pane, near the bottom of the clock tab. Though not customizable to the exact minute; 15, 30, and 60 minutes are optional. I could also see this useful on the Apple watch, though it’s not there yet.